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'Cello Bae' Sheku Kanneh-Mason Wins Worldwide Fans After Royal Wedding

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeDB27cq3fE The British-born, 19-year-old prodigy Sheku Kanneh-Mason was a standout at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle this weekend. Kanneh-Mason performed three pieces during the ceremony, as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex signed the register (out of view of guests and cameras) just after their exchanging of vows. Kanneh-Mason performed Maria Theresia von Paradis' Sicilienne, Gabriel Fauré's Après un rêve and Franz Schubert's "Ave Maria." But,...

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Max Richter's music seems ready-made for movies – and that's not in any way a put down. The music is powerful on its own, but certain pieces take on new depth when paired with well-designed visuals.

Here is a music video in which the things you don't see or hear are almost as important as the things you do.

There's a pivotal, possibly apocryphal scene in Bob Dylan's Chronicles, Vol. 1, wherein the author walks into a bar. He's taking a breather from a wan rehearsal with The Grateful Dead, circa 1987, in Marin County, Calif. What draws him into the bar is the sound of a jazz combo.

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Farewell To Blackfaced Otellos At The Met

Sep 28, 2015

When the curtain rises on the Metropolitan Opera's new production of Verdi's Otello tonight, opera fans will quickly notice what's not there. For the first time since the opera was first staged at the Met in 1891, a white singer performing the title role will not be wearing makeup to darken his complexion to play the Moor at the center of the tragedy.

Over in London, the Independent's arts editor, David Lister, recently published a scathing commentary about the paucity of valuable or even interesting information in artist biographies. He wrote it in a fury after paying £4 to obtain the program for a Proms concert he attended, featuring the excellent German violinist Julia Fischer.

Most working cellists play in classical ensembles that perform in concert halls and music theaters. Tonight, Columbia's Rose Music Hall features a different take on the instrument. The Portland Cello Project is an ensemble interested in testing the boundaries of what you expect from the cello.

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